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FeatherUSA RAV-22

FeatherUSA RAV-22

This is my FeatherUSA RAV-22. I purchased it at the October 2005 Wanenmacher Gun Show. Walking into the gunshow I had absolutely no intention of buying one, nor did I even conceive of owning one as I had only seen them mentioned a few times in a magazine here or there. Well, the salesman at the FeatherUSA booth (in conjunction with the C&J Sporting Goods booth) was quite good at his job. In watching his demonstration I went from a curious onlooker to a buyer. I just had to decide which caliber I wanted (it comes in .45acp, 9mm, and .22lr). I chose .22lr because it will make for a cheap plinking caliber.

So, as it’s a fairly unknown rifle, what is it? Well, it’s got a tube based receiver. It weighs about 3 pound and breaks down (barrel comes off and stock collapses) into a space about 16 inches long. It came with a bag that everything fits into (including the 20rd mag). The particular set that I purchased is called the backpacker model. It doesn’t come with any extras that weigh things down like scope rails, bi-pods, more stable stocks, etc. The wife thinks the iron sights are too low for her to use, so I’ll probably get the top scope rail and attach a lightweight red dot. Other than that, they don’t need improving. Maybe it’s the lack of recoil, but I’m more accurate with this rifle than anything else I have ever used.

Of course, just because I bought it, it’s got some significant problems. From day one, I’ve had some problems with it. I initially attributed them to the tightness of being new, and then to the ammo, but eventually I acquired some Winchester Super X, which is recommended by the factory. Winchester Super X runs much better than just about anything else I’ve tried, but it jams as well. There seem to be 2 types of jams. The first is in feeding. Some rounds merely feed into the edge of the chamber, which is sharp enough to embed itself into the soft lead round. At that point it stops. The round has to be removed and discarded. The second is ejection. Sometimes ejection screws up. Increasingly common is that the spent cartridges are extracted from the chamber, but aren’t properly ejected. Instead, they might partially eject or not eject at all and plant themselves over the feed ramp. I’d deal with this right now to keep things under warranty, but I discovered that the warranty card must have been submitted within 10 days of the rifles purchase to be valid. I’ve passed that point, so it doesn’t really matter how long it takes me to get it worked out. We’ll see how it goes.